Arts Research Monitor

The Arts Research Monitor, created by Hill Strategies Research in 2002, provides synopses of qualitative and quantitative research findings in the arts and culture. The Monitor should be useful to artists, arts managers, funders, policy makers, researchers and others with an interest in learning more about the arts and culture. The Arts Research Monitor is funded by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

17 October 2005
Based on three sources – NEA applications, a Unified Database of Arts Organizations and the economic census – this report paints a statistical portrait of the changing situation of American dance companies (not independent dancers) between 1987 and 1997.
17 October 2005
This report is based on surveys of 50 Aboriginal dance groups and 26 Aboriginal dance artists in Canada.
17 October 2005
This report, prepared by Hill Strategies, uses 71 interviews with media artists, arts organizations and funders to examine the realities, functioning and importance of Canada's media arts sector. The sector was found to be "rapidly changing, difficult to define, very active and struggling to find money for its activities". Interviewees indicated that the production and exhibition of works by Aboriginal and culturally diverse artists are key to the development of the media arts.
17 October 2005
Released with much fanfare, The Value of the Performing Arts in Five Communities demonstrates that, in terms of public participation, the arts are alive and well in Alaska, Cincinnati, Denver, Pittsburgh and Seattle.
17 October 2005
Two NEA Research Notes based on the 2002 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) examine participation in the arts and demographic characteristics of arts attendees. The report on overall participation in the arts shows that 76% of all Americans – or 157 million Americans 18 or older – participated in the arts in some way in 2001/02. This figure is strikingly similar to an equivalent Canadian figure...