Arts Research Monitor

The Arts Research Monitor, created by Hill Strategies Research in 2002, provides synopses of qualitative and quantitative research findings in the arts and culture. The Monitor should be useful to artists, arts managers, funders, policy makers, researchers and others with an interest in learning more about the arts and culture. The Arts Research Monitor is funded by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

29 March 2017

Based on municipal submissions that have been reviewed by their peers, this report compares municipal expenses related to 36 service areas, one of which is culture. In 2015, the median overall cost for cultural services in the eight cities was $26.84 per capita. Expenses for cultural services were highest in Montreal ($43.79), followed by Ottawa ($33.21) and Toronto ($31.81). Median grants for the arts, heritage, and festivals were $8.86 per capita, again highest in Montreal ($23.16), followed by Thunder Bay ($17.59) and Ottawa ($9.70).

22 February 2017

This brief report summarizes data on not-for-profit organizations and businesses “involved in the production or distribution of the arts”. Included in the definition are organizations and businesses such as not-for-profit orchestras, museums and theatres as well as “for-profit film, architecture, and advertising companies”. Overall, the report finds that there are just over 700,000 arts-related organizations and businesses in the U.S., employing 2.9 million people. “This represents 3.9 percent of all U.S. businesses and 1.9 percent of all U.S. employees—demonstrating statistically that the arts are a formidable business presence”.

22 February 2017

This report provides a brief overview of key concepts regarding the term “the creative economy” as well as an extensive bibliography of reports related to the creative economy (as of 2013).

22 February 2017

This study examines worldwide revenues and employment in 11 cultural and creative industries: advertising; architecture; books; gaming; movies; music; newspapers and magazines; performing arts; radio; television; and visual arts and design. Worldwide revenues in the cultural and creative industries totalled $2.25 trillion in 2013, or 3% of global GDP. (All figures are provided in US dollars.) The worldwide revenues of the cultural and creative industries exceed those of the telecommunications services industry ($1.6 trillion).

22 February 2017

Based on Canadian, American, and United Kingdom employment surveys, this report compares the creative economy in the three countries. Based on the definitions used in the report, Canada’s creative economy is comprised of 2.2 million workers, including 534,000 creative workers in creative industries, 815,000 creative workers in non-creative industries, and 893,000 non-creative workers within the creative industries. Comparisons between the three countries show that Canada has the highest share of total employment on three related measures.