Performing arts

Volume: 10 Issue: 3

Legacy ID (armUID): 
1174
In this issue: A focus on performing arts statistics, including a summary of the situation of performing arts organizations, statistics on presenters and independent artists, a survey of audience experiences at music festivals and concerts, as well as an American survey of audience engagement in dance.
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Articles

  • Statistics Canada recently released summary data of performing arts organizations in 2009. Total revenues were $1.3 billion for all for-profit and not-for-profit performing arts groups in 2009, a 3.7% decrease from 2008 (not adjusted for inflation). Not-for-profit performing arts organizations in Canada had total revenues of $643 million in 2009, a 3.8% from 2008.

  • While Statistics Canada's performing arts survey provides information about performing arts companies, this survey provides some information about arts presenters and independent artists, along with sports presenters. However, the data in the survey is very limited.

  • Participation, Appreciation, and Motivation

    This report examines audience motivations for attending and experiences at 24 music festivals and concert series funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage's Arts Presentation Canada program in 2008-09. Regarding motivations for attendance, many respondents chose "overall enjoyment", as well as the "variety of musical styles" and the desire "to spend quality time with friends".

  • This American report, based on a survey of nearly 7,500 dance attendees in the summer of 2010, probes how dance audience members engage with dance presentations. Based on both current and desired levels of involvement with dance, the researchers distilled five key factors in dance attendance: 1) Mental stimulation (i.e., intellectual and creative stimulation); 2) Nurturing (i.e., social and family fulfillment); 3) Repertoire-driven motivations (e.g., see "great works", new artists or new work); 4) Emotional and spiritual motivations; 5) Social bridging and bonding motivations (e.g., to grow closer to one's own culture or to learn about other cultures).