Digital technologies and the cultural sector

Volume: 11 Issue: 6

Legacy ID (armUID): 
1200

In this issue: A focus on Canadian studies that explore the effects of digital technologies on the cultural sector, including two reports examining the sector as a whole, a study of theatre, and a series of articles and reports on e-books.

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Articles

  • Executive Summary

    Based on a literature review and consultation with 250 arts practitioners and cultural workers, this report examines the impact of digital technologies on human resources in the cultural sector. The report argues that, "as the Canadian economy continues to move toward a knowledge-based economy, the creativity exhibited by the cultural sector will only increase in importance".

  • Prepared by David Poole

    This discussion paper, intended for use by arts funding bodies, provides a useful overview of "current knowledge on the theme of digital transition and the impact of new technology on the arts". The paper indicates that "the electronic, networked and interactive nature of the digital world has a significant impact on the arts".

  • This study attempts to address three key research questions: 1) "How is digital media currently used in theatres both in Ontario and beyond and what is the potential for expanding its use?"; 2) "How can the content developed for the stage be adapted and repurposed for use on digital media platforms?"; and 3) "How can theatres use digital media to reach a wider and more demographically diverse audience?"

  • In the consumer book market, a February 2012 survey (National Book Count) found that "e-book sales comprised 10% of all books sold in English Canada. Public libraries reported that 3% of their circulation comprised digital formats. This finding puts English Canada near the very top of international estimates on e-reading." Another survey (fall 2012) reported that e-book sales represent about 16% of all books sold in Canada, with paperbacks representing 57% of the market and hardcovers 24%.