Culture in small and rural communities

Volume: 8 Issue: 9

Legacy ID (armUID): 
1146
In this issue: A number of recent reports have examined how the arts can contribute to the quality of life as well as the social and economic well-being of small and rural communities. These reports have also examined factors that attract artists or contribute to the vitality of the arts in small and rural communities.
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Articles

  • Summary Overview

    The Creative City Network of Canada commissioned a series of reports on Developing and Revitalizing Rural Communities through Arts and Creativity. The summary overview of these reports sets the context: "As rural communities re-envision and reposition themselves, they are seeking to revitalize, diversity their economic base, enhance their quality of life, and reinvent themselves for new functions and roles."

  • This report summarizes the results of three forums in Ontario (Brockville, Chatham and Minett / Muskoka) about municipal cultural planning. The forums were designed to "build awareness of the value and economic development opportunity" presented by cultural planning, to demonstrate community examples and success stories, as well as to identify tools and barriers in implementing municipal cultural planning.
  • An International English-Language Literature Review and Inventory of Resources

    The literature review in the Creative City Network of Canada series of reports on Developing and Revitalizing Rural Communities through Arts and Creativity examines the nature of cultural activity in rural communities, the community context for arts development, the role of the arts in economic development, and governance strategies.

  • This report provides an analysis of artists residing in small and rural municipalities in Canada. One-quarter of the 140,000 artists in Canada reside in small and rural municipalities (36,500 artists, or 26%). West Bolton (in Quebec's Eastern Townships) is the only municipality in Canada with over 10% of its labour force in arts occupations.