Business support for the arts / Economic and social benefits

Volume: 13 Issue: 8

In this issue: Summaries of recent reports that examine business support for the arts in Canada, perceptions of businesses and the public regarding supporting the arts, the social and economic benefits of arts organizations in Alberta, the long-term economic impacts of the arts in American metropolitan areas, and potential indicators of the benefits of the arts for community livability.

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Articles

  • Results of Business for the Arts’ 2014 Research Initiative

    As the report’s title indicates, one of the key findings of this presentation of ongoing research is that many Canadians look favourably on companies that support the arts. A public survey found that 52% of respondents “feel more favourably towards businesses that support arts and culture”.

  • Ripple Effects from the Arts Sector

    This report examines the benefits “for people, communities and the economy” of arts organizations receiving operating funding from the Alberta Foundation for the Arts (AFA) over a seven year period (2006-2013). In addition to statistics from operating funding recipients, the report includes statistics from other sources, such as a public survey that was conducted in the province.

  • The causal link between the arts and economic growth

    Using historical data from 384 American metropolitan areas, the exploratory research in this report examines whether an increase in the spending of local not-for-profit arts and culture organizations has a long-term, positive impact on the local economy. The empirical data lead the researchers to conclude that there is a positive relationship between per capita cultural production and per capita GDP, resulting in “a permanent increase in per capita GDP”. (The authors note that, “in the context of our model, asking whether cultural spending ‘causes’ economic prosperity is asking whether transitory innovations or ‘shocks’ [in cultural production] … cause permanent changes” to per capita GDP.)

  • Results and Recommendations

    Based on site visits of grant recipients from the National Endowment for the Arts’ “Our Town” initiative, a one-day session with other grant recipients, and a focus group with creative placemaking experts, this report examines the usefulness of 23 potential indicators of the contribution of the arts and culture to quality of place and community livability. The report defines creative placemaking as processes where “partners from public, private, non-profit and community sectors strategically shape the physical and social character of a neighborhood, town, city or region around arts and cultural activities”.