Resources

Estimates of the direct contribution of culture to GDP and employment in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba in 2014.

Using the industry perspective, Statistics Canada estimates that the direct economic impact of culture industries (also known as value added or gross domestic product) was $61.7 billion in Canada in 2014, or 3.3% of the country’s GDP. In 2014, there were 700,100 jobs directly related to culture industries, or 3.9% of the 18.1 million jobs in the country.

Statistics Canada’s report on Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators (PTCI) measures the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage, similar to the 2010 Culture Satellite Account (CSA). The PTCI estimates are based on economic projections, so they should not be considered as precise as the CSA data.

Based on a survey of over 4,000 orchestra attendees and “the largest ever orchestra sales dataset” from 44 American orchestras and one Canadian one (the National Arts Centre Orchestra), this report examines “why people subscribe, why they lapse, and what they might want that is not currently being offered” in current orchestra subscription packages.

Employing a cost-benefit analysis (based on a national consumer survey, venue owner and operator interviews, and secondary data on the sector), this report attempts to provide “a valuation of the economic, social and cultural contribution” of live music in Australia. The headline finding of the report is that, “for every dollar spent on live music in Australia, $3.00 worth of benefits are returned to the wider Australian community”.

Key elements, effective strategies & why it's worth pursuing

This report, based on a literature review, over 40 expert interviews, and two international focus group sessions, aims to provide a “roadmap” for the development of music, especially the commercial music sector, in municipalities of any size, anywhere in the world. The report outlines five essential elements of “music cities”:

  • The presence of “artists and musicians;
  • A thriving music scene;
  • Access to spaces and places;
  • A receptive and engaged audience; and
  • Record labels and other music-related businesses”.

Based largely on a survey of 372 companies in Ontario’s live music sector, this report attempts to identify the impacts of live music on Ontario’s economy, employment, and communities. The report also endeavours to serve as a benchmark for the measurement of changes in the live music sector.

This literature review investigates how some cultural organizations and funders have improved “diversity in cultural organizations, in the areas of their leadership, staffing, programming and audience composition”. Elements of diversity include race, culture, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and age.