Resources

Statistics Canada’s recent release of Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators (PTCI) provides estimates of the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage, similar to the 2010 and 2013 Culture Satellite Account (CSA). The PTCI estimates for 2015 and 2016 are based on economic projections, so they should not be considered as precise as the data for 2010 through 2014 (which could be considered “actuals” rather than “projections”).

2013 Arts Facts using CADAC Data

A brief summary accompanies two longer reports that highlight the situation of 49 media arts presenters and 45 production centres “that receive recurring funding from the Media Arts Section of the Canada Council for the Arts”, based on financial and statistical data reported to CADAC (Canadian Arts Data / Données sur les arts au Canada).

Sector Developers for Independent Theatre in Toronto

This report, “largely based on 29 interviews with staff, participants and related stakeholders”, explores two initiatives that support independent theatre makers in Toronto: Generator (“a capacity building and mentoring organization for independent performance makers”) and The RISER Project (“a collaborative and charitable approach to production and presentation”).

Noting that “social finance tools create opportunities for investors to finance projects that realize both financial and social returns”, this report outlines existing literature related to social finance and how it might be applied toward the arts.

This report estimates that 3.5 million Canadians sang in a choir in 2017, or 10% of the country’s population, based on a public survey of 2,000 Canadians. The report also uses the results of the public survey to estimate that “7.8 million Canadian adults (18 or older) attended a choral performance in 2016”, or 28% of the adult population. The report estimates that there are 27,700 choirs in Canada, the majority of which are church choirs (17,500, or 63%).

Primarily based on a survey of over 7,500 Australians 15 and older (as well as similar surveys in 2009 and 2013), this report outlines key data on Australians’ arts participation, recognition of the value of the arts, and attitudes toward the arts. A key finding of the report is that 98% of Australians engaged with the arts in some way in 2016.

Culture Track summarizes survey findings related to Americans’ cultural engagement as well as the “attitudes, motivators, and barriers to participation”. The top motivators for cultural participation are having fun (chosen by 81% of respondents), interest in the content (78%), experiencing new things (76%), feeling less stressed (also 76%), and learning something new (71%). Across all types of cultural activities, the top barrier to participation is the belief that “it’s not for someone like me”. Survey results indicate that “audiences have different needs and wants at different times – or even simultaneously”.

This international literature review attempts “to better understand whether research has shown that arts experiences of any kind – whether conventional audience experiences or newer “engagement” experiences, learning in the arts, or making art itself – affect civic engagement”. A key finding of the report is that “correlations between arts participation and the motivations and practices of civic engagement are substantial and consistent.” However, “the effects of the arts are likely to be cumulative over significant time and difficult to document: a slow drip rather than a sudden eruption, and easy to take for granted”.