Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Other topics

This article highlights the financial situation of performing arts presenters between 2003-04 and 2011-12 based on aggregated data from 531 presenters receiving federal funding through the Canada Arts Presentation Fund. For the 531 presenters as a group, private sector revenues accounted for a larger proportion of revenues (40%) than earned revenues (36%) and public sector funding (24%) in 2011-12.

Understanding Canadian Arts Through CADAC Data

Based on financial and statistical data reported to CADAC (Canadian Arts Data / Données sur les arts au Canada), this report outlines the finances and activities of 75 artist-run centres “that receive recurring funding from the Visual Arts Section of the Canada Council for the Arts”. In 2013, the 75 artist-run centres had total operating revenues of about $18 million, 73% of which was received from government sources (including 42% from the Canada Council), 15% from private sector fundraising, and 11% from earned revenues.

Understanding Canadian Arts Through CADAC Data

This report examines the finances and activities of 77 public art galleries “that receive recurring funding from the Visual Arts Section of the Canada Council for the Arts”, based on their financial and statistical data submitted to CADAC (Canadian Arts Data / Données sur les arts au Canada). In 2013, the 77 galleries had total operating revenues of $245 million, 45% of which was received from government sources (all such sources, not just the Canada Council), 26% from earned revenues, 20% from private sector fundraising, and 9% from other revenue sources.

A multi-method, cross-genre examination of how US based musicians and composers are earning a living

This series of reports examines the revenues of musicians and composers in the United States based on an online survey (5,371 respondents), in-person interviews with more than 80 musicians, and six case studies of musicians' financial records. While the survey sample is very large, the online methodology (where individuals self-select whether to respond) may not provide a statistically representative, randomized sample of all U.S. musicians.

(Un portrait de la chanson québécoise)

Prepared for a 2013 Forum on Quebec Song, this French-language opinion piece attempts to stimulate reflection on the state of Quebec song and French-language song in particular.  Raising important questions, the article examines topics such as internationalization, technological change, touring, training, and funding. The article argues that “these days, much imagination is required to develop new sources of revenue” for singers, songwriters, and music groups.

Unlike some other countries, including Canada, visual artists in the United Kingdom do not have a standard fee structure for exhibiting in public galleries. The “Paying Artists” campaign, which is attempting to change that, has produced a number of research reports.A 2013 survey of 1,061 artists was conducted and summarized in a report on “Phase 1 Findings”.

An analysis of the educational backgrounds of working artists and the labour market activities of arts program graduates in Canada

Based on the 2013 National Graduates Survey and the 2011 National Household Survey, this report examines the labour force situation of arts graduates and the post-secondary education of artists in Canada.

Understanding How Participation in Arts and Culture Can Affect our Values

Taking the form of a core essay and a number of critical responses, the report attempts to start “a dialogue about how arts and culture impact on our values”, including “deep values” such as “self-acceptance, affiliation, community feeling, freedom, creativity, self-respect, equality, [and] unity with nature”.

New Citizens, Sports & Belonging

While not related to the arts, this report is an interesting example of research into new citizens’ participation in Canadian life, in the world of sports. The report is based on a survey of 4,157 new citizens residing in urban areas who have participated “in the Institute for Canadian Citizenship’s Cultural Access Pass program”, focus groups in eight Canadian cities, and a literature review of sports organizations’ focus on immigration and diversity.

Based on a non-random online survey of about 500 Toronto residents as well as three focus group sessions, this report indicates that 97% of respondents “see at least one benefit of the arts to the City of Toronto”. The two most commonly selected benefits to the City were attracting tourists (79%) and highlighting the city’s cultural diversity (71%).