Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Other topics

Survey Data Report

Based on a survey completed by 907 arts organizations and 2,680 artists in Canada, this report examines “the impact of digital technologies on the creation, dissemination and business practices of individual artists and arts organizations in Canada”. In general, most respondents self-identified as “comfortable” or “very comfortable” using digital technologies (71% of organizations and 60% of artists). Just over one-third of arts organizations (38%) and one-half of artists (54%) have created “digital-first” works of art.

Based on a survey of over 14,000 attendees at performances by 23 choirs (including the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir and 22 American choruses), this report examines the experiences of audiences at live choral concerts. The goal of the research was to spur “critical reflection on how audiences construct meaning and memory from concerts of choral music, and how choruses can curate impacts through thoughtful program design”.

This review article, a work in progress from an American cultural research group, evaluates and summarizes evidence regarding the benefits of the arts for individuals. The researchers examine research evidence in four categories: physical and mental health; education and personal development; economic vitality; and social cohesion. While the researchers recognize that existing research is not definitive, they do conclude that “arts participation really does improve lives”.

Summarizing secondary research into the value of the arts and arts education, this report from the United Kingdom finds that “arts and culture are a life-enhancing and essential part of our existence". An accompanying report (Key Research Findings: The Case for Cultural Learning) provides further details about the research highlighted in ImagineNation.

Based on a literature review, existing statistics, two focus groups, and a targeted survey of 30 stakeholders, this report examines “the patterns of attendance and cultural participation by young people in the theatre for young audiences (TYA) and the children’s festival sector in Canada”.

Two recent reports about the arts and culture in the Alberta Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo (i.e., Fort McMurray and area) resulted from three research streams: 1) a telephone survey of a representative sample of local residents; 2) an internet survey of local artists and arts organizations; and 3) a literature review regarding the arts and regeneration after a disaster.

The Ottawa Insights series examines key data related to various “themes” that are important to local quality of life, including the arts and culture. The report provides information related to four areas of the arts and culture: Public participation; Programs and facilities; Investment in the arts; The arts and recreation economy.

Informing the Future

Based on a survey of 120 municipalities, this report examines the state of municipally-owned infrastructure in seven sectors: buildings; sport and recreation facilities; roads and bridges; transit; potable water; wastewater; and stormwater. The buildings sector includes “community centres and cultural facilities”.

Based on municipal submissions that have been reviewed by their peers, this report compares municipal expenses related to 36 service areas, one of which is culture. In 2015, the median overall cost for cultural services in the eight cities was $26.84 per capita. Expenses for cultural services were highest in Montreal ($43.79), followed by Ottawa ($33.21) and Toronto ($31.81). Median grants for the arts, heritage, and festivals were $8.86 per capita, again highest in Montreal ($23.16), followed by Thunder Bay ($17.59) and Ottawa ($9.70).

Business & Employment in the Arts: Measuring the Scope of the Nation’s Arts-Related Industries

This brief report summarizes data on not-for-profit organizations and businesses “involved in the production or distribution of the arts”. Included in the definition are organizations and businesses such as not-for-profit orchestras, museums and theatres as well as “for-profit film, architecture, and advertising companies”. Overall, the report finds that there are just over 700,000 arts-related organizations and businesses in the U.S., employing 2.9 million people. “This represents 3.9 percent of all U.S. businesses and 1.9 percent of all U.S. employees—demonstrating statistically that the arts are a formidable business presence”.