Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Women in the arts

Based on experiences conducting demographic surveys of arts organizations in Chicago, Minnesota, Los Angeles, and Houston, this article outlines key findings regarding the measurement of identity-related characteristics (but not actual survey results). The surveys focused on five characteristics: race/ethnicity, age, gender, LBGTQ status, and disability status.

Based predominantly on a survey of 2,487 creative sector workers in the United Kingdom (called the Panic! Survey), this report concludes that “the cultural and creative industries are marked by significant inequalities”.

This report summarizes the diversity within English arts organizations in 2016/17, based largely on an annual Arts Council England survey completed by larger client organizations. The report’s diversity statistics include a focus on disability, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

Results of the 2015 SNAAP Survey Module

This report, based on responses from 26,200 alumni of arts programs in 43 American institutions, provides “insights into the current state of career skills and entrepreneurship education in arts schools”. The author argues that “building strong business and entrepreneurial skills will prepare [arts] students for a career in a job market that increasingly rewards entrepreneurship”.

This report, based on a survey of 210 American art museums in 2016 that followed up on issues uncovered in a similar survey in 2013, finds that a “gender gap persists” in art museums, despite “incremental gains in some areas of pay and employment representation”. Of the 210 responses from art museum directors in 2016, 100 were female (48%). While women direct most of the museums with budgets below $15 million (54%), female directors represent one-third or less of all museum directors in larger institutions.

Given the “severe lack of hard data” on diversity in Canadian art galleries, the author of this report, with assistance from anonymous collaborators, created a dataset of the diversity in select leadership positions in 80 galleries that have received core funding from the Canada Council for the Arts (as well as the separately-funded National Gallery of Canada). The resulting statistics indicate that “gallery management is whiter than Canadian [visual] artists in particular, and the Canadian public in general”. Regarding gender equity, the report finds that “women dominate Canada’s art field” but their majority is weakest in its top echelons.

A Report on the Socio-Economic Status of Canadian Visual Artists

This series of brief web articles aims to depict “the socio-economic conditions faced by Canadian resident professional visual artists” in 2012, with specific articles on ethnicity, sex, and gallery representation. The survey found that nearly one-half of Canadian visual artists lost money on their artistic practice in 2012 (47%). The average personal income of visual artists was $29,300, the largest portions of which came from art-related employment (average of $19,200) and non-art-related employment (average of $5,700). After adjusting for inflation, the overall average income in 2012 was 6% higher than the 2007 level ($27,600).

(Les artistes en arts visuels québécois : un aperçu statistique)

This brief report examines the situation of the estimated 3,632 visual artists in Quebec. The report estimates that 60% of Quebec visual artists are women and only 12% are under 35 years of age (compared with 37% of the overall Quebec labour force). The average personal income (from all sources) of all Quebec visual artists is $35,400. The average is much lower for women ($27,600) than men ($40,900). Fifty-seven percent of Quebec visual artists have total individual incomes below $30,000, with a higher percentage among women (64%) and artists under 35 (66%).

(Les danseurs et chorégraphes québécois : Portrait des conditions de pratique de la profession de la danse au Québec, 2010)

This report examines the situation of the estimated 650 dancers and choreographers in Quebec. The survey found that the average personal income of Quebec dancers is $27,400. However, their net earnings (i.e., after expenses) from dance artistic activities are only $9,300.

The most recent report in Hill Strategies' Statistical Insights on the Arts series highlights the number and earnings of artists in Canada's provinces, territories and Census Metropolitan Areas based on the 2001 census.