Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Provincial and local statistics

Kelly Hill recently conducted a number of presentations in smaller cities, including St. John's, St. Catharines and Barrie. These presentations provide some insights into the situation of arts and culture in smaller and regional centres.

This report, prepared for the Saskatchewan Arts Alliance, relies on Statistics Canada data to examine provincial government spending on culture in 2008-09. While the detailed findings are specific to Saskatchewan, the comparisons between provinces provide information related to the entire country. The report notes that, on a per capita basis, provincial spending on culture is highest in Newfoundland and Labrador ($139 per capita), Saskatchewan ($132), Prince Edward Island ($123) and Quebec ($121).

Statistics Canada recently released a brief overview and data regarding government spending on culture in 2008-09. Hill Strategies has analyzed this data for this issue of the Arts Research Monitor. In 2008-09, governments spent $9.3 billion on culture, excluding transfers between different levels of government. This represents a 16% increase from 2003-04 (after adjusting for inflation).

Based on a compilation and analysis of existing statistics, this report provides detailed information about the cultural sector labour market, including seven cultural domains: "live performing arts; film, radio, TV, and broadcasting; music; heritage; books and periodicals; visual arts and crafts; and interactive digital media". The report outlines information about cultural occupations and employers, the cultural sector's economic situation, the financial performance of the seven cultural domains, as well as data challenges and opportunities. While most of the information is national in scope, the report does provide some provincial tables.

Noting that "Canada has consistently ranked as one of the happiest nations in the world", this report indicates that, on a scale from one to five, the average self-assessed rating of the happiness of Canadians is 4.26. Within Canada, happiness is highest on Prince Edward Island (4.33) and lowest in Ontario (4.23) and British Columbia (4.24). Among Census Metropolitan Areas, average happiness is highest in Sherbrooke (4.37), Brantford (4.36), and Trois-Rivières (4.35) and lowest in Toronto (4.15) and Vancouver (4.20).

Based on a telephone survey of 1,000 adult Ontarians, this report highlights public perceptions regarding the value and benefits of the arts. Comparisons are provided with a similar survey conducted in 1994.

Based on a Statistics Canada survey of the spending habits of nearly 10,000 Canadian households in 2008, this report examines variations in performing arts spending between households, including differences in average spending and the percentage of households spending any money on live performing arts. The report found that total consumer spending on live performing arts was just over $1.4 billion in 2008, which is an average of $108 per Canadian household. Between 2001 and 2008, total consumer spending on live performances increased by 49% (after inflation).

Hill Strategies has analyzed Statistics Canada's 2008 data on peforming arts organizations, with a particular focus on non-profit organizations. In 2008, non-profit performing arts organizations in Canada had operating revenues of $668 million, a 1.4% increase from 2007. Operating expenses equalled operating revenues ($668 million), leaving no collective surplus or deficit in 2008. Total attendance was 13.7 million at nearly 43,000 performances, for an average of 318 attendees per performance. Single-ticket sales accounted for almost twice as much revenue as subscription tickets ($142 million vs. $75 million).

From Informal to Formal Accounts

Based on surveys completed by 430 Manitoba schools and 29 school divisions, this report examines the situation of arts education in Manitoba schools in 2006-07. The study finds that music and visual arts programs or courses are much more commonly available than drama and dance programs or courses.

While there has been extensive international research on the benefits of music education for young people, there has been only limited research on the state of music education in Canada. Prepared for the Coalition for Music Education in Canada by Hill Strategies, A Delicate Balance provides detailed information about a range of issues in music education based on a survey of 1,204 schools across Canada.