Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Provincial and local statistics

A first look at data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth

Based on 10,309 parents responding to Statistics Canada's National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this report provides information about the participation of young children in arts and reading activities outside of school in 2008. The report finds that:

  • 18% of children between three and seven years old "take weekly lessons or instruction in music, art or other non sport activities. On the other hand, 80% 'almost never' take lessons or instruction in music, art or other non sport activities. The remaining 2% take lessons or instruction in music, art or other non sport activities 'about once a month'."
  • 35% of children between three and seven years old "take weekly lessons or instruction in dance, gymnastics or martial arts (or 'other organized physical activities'). In contrast, about two-thirds (64%) 'almost never' take lessons or instruction in dance, gymnastics or martial arts. Only 1% of children of all age groups take lessons or instruction in dance, gymnastics or martial arts 'about once a month'."
  • "A majority of children read on their own on a daily basis: 73% of three year olds do so (including those who 'look at books'); 68% of four and five year olds do so; and 70% of six year olds read daily. The percentage is lower for seven year old children, 52% of whom read for pleasure daily. Note: The slightly different phrasing of the question for seven year olds ('read for pleasure') may have an effect on these results."

Based on a survey of senior arts education staff members and artistic directors of 50 Toronto-area performing arts companies, this report provides information about "the range, reach and impact of the arts education programs of dance, music, opera and theatre organizations in the Toronto area".

This brief report examines the economic impact of travellers who attended cultural events, attended sporting events or participated in team sports in 2007. Regarding tourism receipts, the report indicates that tourists who attended cultural activities spent a total of $8.0 billion in 2007. Regarding net economic impact, cultural tourists generated $5.1 billion of economic activity, over 110,000 full-time jobs, and $419 million in government taxes (an estimate that does not include income taxes).

(Les écrivains québécois : un aperçu statistique, Optique culture, no 3)

This brief report outlines the situation of the estimated 1,510 writers in Quebec, based on a survey of writers. The report finds that, while the median personal income of Quebec writers is $39,400, their median earnings from literary creation are only about $2,500. On average, Quebec writers spend 43% of their work time on literary creation. Using writers' creative earnings as well as socio-demographic and professional information, the report proposes a typology of six groups of writers.

(La fréquentation des institutions muséales au Québec en 2010, Optique culture, no 4)

The 431 Quebec museums, interpretive centres and exhibition spaces (excluding artist-run centres) responding to this survey had total attendance of 12.8 million in 2010, the highest level since the Observatoire began collecting such statistics in 2003. This number includes relatively large off-site attendance at Montreal museum events in public places in 2010. Excluding off-site exhibitions, total attendance was 11.9 million in 2010. This is close to the average for the past five years.

Results from a 2011 Province-wide Study of the Arts Engagement Patterns of Ontario Adults

This report is based on a survey of 1,594 Ontario adults covering their personal practice, attendance and media-based consumption of 45 different arts activities. The report challenges "the arts community and its funders to consider the totality of engagement when looking to increase participation" and concludes that "increasing arts engagement in Ontario will require making new connections between different parts of the ecosystem and tapping into deep veins of cultural value".

Statistics Canada recently released summary data of performing arts organizations in 2009. Total revenues were $1.3 billion for all for-profit and not-for-profit performing arts groups in 2009, a 3.7% decrease from 2008 (not adjusted for inflation). Not-for-profit performing arts organizations in Canada had total revenues of $643 million in 2009, a 3.8% from 2008.

Kelly Hill recently conducted a number of presentations in smaller cities, including St. John's, St. Catharines and Barrie. These presentations provide some insights into the situation of arts and culture in smaller and regional centres.

This report, prepared for the Saskatchewan Arts Alliance, relies on Statistics Canada data to examine provincial government spending on culture in 2008-09. While the detailed findings are specific to Saskatchewan, the comparisons between provinces provide information related to the entire country. The report notes that, on a per capita basis, provincial spending on culture is highest in Newfoundland and Labrador ($139 per capita), Saskatchewan ($132), Prince Edward Island ($123) and Quebec ($121).

Statistics Canada recently released a brief overview and data regarding government spending on culture in 2008-09. Hill Strategies has analyzed this data for this issue of the Arts Research Monitor. In 2008-09, governments spent $9.3 billion on culture, excluding transfers between different levels of government. This represents a 16% increase from 2003-04 (after adjusting for inflation).