Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Organizational planning, management, governance & marketing

Based on large-scale surveys of English adults, this report aims to provide “a tool to inform marketing and audience development plans for arts organisations, local authorities and other agencies working in the arts”. The report outlines 13 arts consumer segments, based on patterns of arts consumption, attitudes toward the arts, leisure pursuits, socio-demographic factors, media consumption, and lifestyle elements. The segments, although tailored to English adults, might also be useful for Canadian artists and arts organizations in thinking about the possible attitudes, opinions, and motivations of their current and potential audiences.
Discussion paper
The goal of this discussion paper is to provide “a high-level overview of current thinking and practices in the sphere of public engagement in the arts”. The report indicates that public engagement is increasingly seen to be important “for cultural rights, arts education, expressive life, citizen participation, social cohesion, and cultural diversity”.

This report examines demographic and motivational factors in theatre, dance and classical music attendance in Boston, Seattle, and Minneapolis-St. Paul based on surveys conducted in 2002. The researchers created statistical models to investigate similarities and differences in factors in attendance between the three cities and the three art forms.

Arguing that "the effects of globalization and the digital environment present an important challenge for cultural policies and institutions", this recent conference brought together experts from Canada, Europe, and the United States in order to "allow participants to review the traditional model of cultural development, with particular emphasis on the cultural behaviour of immigrant populations and of younger generations".

Presentation for the Performing Arts Alliance with funding from the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council

Because many organizations in the performing arts and other cultural disciplines have similar clientele, this presentation encouraged performing arts organizations to collaborate with other organizations and to consider joint marketing endeavours in order to gain new visitors to all types of organizations. The presentation also outlined some sponsorship possibilities for performing arts organizations, by highlighting other types of businesses that are also frequented by high-spending performing arts goers.

This report argues that "a great shift is underway as participatory arts practice moves closer to the core of public value". According to the authors, this provides the arts community with "an opportunity to engage the collaborative, co-creative, open source mindset that is present in every community". The report argues that "arts groups devoted solely to a consumption model of program delivery will slowly lose ground in a competitive marketplace".

Based on a survey of 4,005 Americans 18 years of age or over, Culture Track 2011 examines attendance at visual and performing arts events, the attitudes and behaviours of cultural audiences, as well as the motivations and barriers that influence participation.

With the perspective that "we are witnessing a dynamic shift in [cultural] participation, both in amount and in form", this series of case studies was prepared to help arts organizations attract and engage new audiences, in order to help secure their artistic and financial sustainability.

This report provides an examination of the challenges, needs and opportunities of Toronto-based mid-career contemporary dance creators. Based on an in-depth survey of 14 dancer-choreographers, the report notes that the mid-career dancers are on average 39 years old, with 18 years of professional dance experience and an average annual income of about $18,000.

This report explores possibilities for measuring the social impacts of organizations' activities, despite challenges such as "the lack of a common measure of how much good has been done" and the lack of an "agreed unit of social impact" that might be equivalent to financial metrics used in market transactions.