Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Organizational planning, management, governance & marketing

Based on the author’s research and personal immersion “over the past three years in the complexities of arts support systems and their relationship to contemporary practice”, this report argues that “we need to realign our arts policy mindset and funding practices to support a new generation of arts development in Canada. To do this will require collaborative action on the part of the arts community and its funders.”

A powerful possibility for a more resilient arts sector

With explosive growth in the arts over the past two decades, this report argues that “it is increasingly difficult to raise the resources required to support an ongoing organizational structure and keep it healthy”. Given this situation, the author proposes that shared administrative platforms, specifically charitable venture organizations, “could make a significant impact on improving the health of the arts sector”.

An Attempt to Debunk Myths around Innovation and Identify How Grantmakers Can Support Adaptive Change

Based on his consulting experience with many American arts organizations, the author of this opinion piece outlines myths and realities about innovation in not-for-profit arts organizations. For the author, “innovation is a newly emerging, organization-wide discipline, the most far-reaching new set of capacities arts organizations can learn, and the most powerful new discipline to enter our field since the advent of strategic planning in the 1970s”.

Executive Summary

Based on a 2012 survey of 180 community investment professionals working in Canadian businesses, this report examines how businesses support community initiatives. The survey found that the four most common types of community investments are “contributing money to community organizations; providing contributions through sponsorships or marketing activities; providing in-kind resources, services and goods; and supporting employee volunteering programs”.

A summary of findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on a survey of 1,500 businesses, this fact sheet highlights select findings regarding the corporate community investment practices of all responding businesses as well as a breakout of 93 larger corporations (revenues over $25 million). The survey found that 76% of all businesses provided funding to not-for-profit organizations. Almost all large corporations (97%) did so. The broader business community gave a slightly larger percentage of their pre-tax profits (1.25%) than large corporations (1%).

Findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community (presentation)

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this presentation provides detailed findings regarding corporate community investment practices, motivations, and challenges. Regarding business views of not-for-profit organizations, the survey found that 73% of all businesses agree that “charities and nonprofits generally improve the quality of life in Canada”.

Further findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this report examines which industry sectors tend to provide different types of support. The goal of this information is to help not-for-profit organizations “tailor their corporate fundraising to the sectors that are most likely to be responsive to their specific needs”.

Based on large-scale surveys of English adults, this report aims to provide “a tool to inform marketing and audience development plans for arts organisations, local authorities and other agencies working in the arts”. The report outlines 13 arts consumer segments, based on patterns of arts consumption, attitudes toward the arts, leisure pursuits, socio-demographic factors, media consumption, and lifestyle elements. The segments, although tailored to English adults, might also be useful for Canadian artists and arts organizations in thinking about the possible attitudes, opinions, and motivations of their current and potential audiences.
Discussion paper
The goal of this discussion paper is to provide “a high-level overview of current thinking and practices in the sphere of public engagement in the arts”. The report indicates that public engagement is increasingly seen to be important “for cultural rights, arts education, expressive life, citizen participation, social cohesion, and cultural diversity”.

This report examines demographic and motivational factors in theatre, dance and classical music attendance in Boston, Seattle, and Minneapolis-St. Paul based on surveys conducted in 2002. The researchers created statistical models to investigate similarities and differences in factors in attendance between the three cities and the three art forms.