Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Human resources

These four Statistics Canada products examine the culture sector's contribution to Gross Domestic Product and employment in various Canadian jurisdictions.

Based on an in-depth survey of 13,000 incorporated not-for-profit organizations, the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations (NSNVO) provides substantial information about revenues, staffing, volunteers and problems in incorporated nonprofit organizations. Of an estimated 161,000 incorporated nonprofit organizations in Canada, 13,770 are involved in the arts and culture.
Ann Markusen, Greg Schrock and Martina Cameron, University of Minnesota

The Artistic Dividend Revisited updates Markusen's 2003 study on The Artistic Dividend (see Arts Research Monitor Vol. 2 No 5) by providing information from the 2000 U.S. Census on arts occupation clusters (performing artists, visual artists, writers and musicians) and the location decision-making of artists.

This report explores the potential clustering of arts and cultural industries in Canadian Census Metropolitan Areas using four main factors: cultural production; cultural employment; education in cultural programs; and the migration of cultural workers.
The most recent report in Hill Strategies' Statistical Insights on the Arts series highlights the number and earnings of artists in Canada's provinces, territories and Census Metropolitan Areas based on the 2001 census.
The report notes that "three issues stand out as the key elements of a national, cross-sectoral human resources development strategy": management, career self-employment, and career-long learning. The report outlines challenges, objectives and options for action in addressing these issues.
Culture sector employment, 1991-2003

The first of these two reports on cultural sector work, The culture sector labour force: Has the 1990s boom turned to bust?, received significant media coverage for its speculation that, based largely on a very small decrease in cultural employment in 2002, the growth of the cultural sector labour force in the 1990s might have halted after the year 2000. However, the second report, Culture sector employment, 1991-2003, which updates the data to 2003, appears to show that the 2002 decrease was an aberration in an otherwise strong growth pattern.

This report examines the arts, culture and heritage workforce in Canada, based on 45 occupations from the 2001 census.
Focusing on nine arts occupations, A Statistical Profile of Artists in Canada finds a number of significant characteristics about artists, including high levels of education, a high proportion of self-employment, a predominance of women, very low earnings, and strong growth in the number of artists between 1971 and 2001.