Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Human resources

Based on the 2011 National Household Survey and the Labour Force Survey

These two reports from Hill Strategies examine the situation of artists and cultural workers in Canadian provinces, territories, and municipalities. This summary provides brief highlights of the data on artists and cultural workers organized by province and territory.

Based on the 2011 National Household Survey and the Labour Force Survey

This report examines the situation of artists and cultural workers in Canada. In Canada, there are 136,600 people who work as artists more than at any other occupation, a figure that is “slightly larger than the labour force in automotive manufacturing (133,000)”. As noted in the national report, “one in every 129 Canadian workers is an artist”.

Key findings

The goal of the research outlined in this presentation was to provide “reliable, detailed data on public art galleries across Ontario”, thereby influencing art gallery sector analysis as well as organizations’ benchmarking and future planning.

Based on the author’s research and personal immersion “over the past three years in the complexities of arts support systems and their relationship to contemporary practice”, this report argues that “we need to realign our arts policy mindset and funding practices to support a new generation of arts development in Canada. To do this will require collaborative action on the part of the arts community and its funders.”

A powerful possibility for a more resilient arts sector

With explosive growth in the arts over the past two decades, this report argues that “it is increasingly difficult to raise the resources required to support an ongoing organizational structure and keep it healthy”. Given this situation, the author proposes that shared administrative platforms, specifically charitable venture organizations, “could make a significant impact on improving the health of the arts sector”.

Executive Summary

Based on a literature review and consultation with 250 arts practitioners and cultural workers, this report examines the impact of digital technologies on human resources in the cultural sector. The report argues that, "as the Canadian economy continues to move toward a knowledge-based economy, the creativity exhibited by the cultural sector will only increase in importance".

This report provides an examination of the challenges, needs and opportunities of Toronto-based mid-career contemporary dance creators. Based on an in-depth survey of 14 dancer-choreographers, the report notes that the mid-career dancers are on average 39 years old, with 18 years of professional dance experience and an average annual income of about $18,000.

Based on a compilation and analysis of existing statistics, this report provides detailed information about the cultural sector labour market, including seven cultural domains: "live performing arts; film, radio, TV, and broadcasting; music; heritage; books and periodicals; visual arts and crafts; and interactive digital media". The report outlines information about cultural occupations and employers, the cultural sector's economic situation, the financial performance of the seven cultural domains, as well as data challenges and opportunities. While most of the information is national in scope, the report does provide some provincial tables.

Based on a literature review, 39 key informant interviews, 15 focus group sessions and an online survey (completed by 2,698 cultural workers and employers), this report identifies key trends and issues regarding human resources in Canada's cultural sector and provides recommendations for addressing human resource challenges.

Based on a survey and interviews with artists in Los Angeles and San Francisco, this report examines artists' work patterns in three separate but related spheres: the commercial sector, the non-profit sector, and the community sector. The authors argue that artists' "uniquely high self-employment rates and long, often slow, and challenging career paths require a singular set of institutional supports and policies".