Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Human resources

Executive Summary

Based on a literature review and consultation with 250 arts practitioners and cultural workers, this report examines the impact of digital technologies on human resources in the cultural sector. The report argues that, "as the Canadian economy continues to move toward a knowledge-based economy, the creativity exhibited by the cultural sector will only increase in importance".

This report provides an examination of the challenges, needs and opportunities of Toronto-based mid-career contemporary dance creators. Based on an in-depth survey of 14 dancer-choreographers, the report notes that the mid-career dancers are on average 39 years old, with 18 years of professional dance experience and an average annual income of about $18,000.

Based on a compilation and analysis of existing statistics, this report provides detailed information about the cultural sector labour market, including seven cultural domains: "live performing arts; film, radio, TV, and broadcasting; music; heritage; books and periodicals; visual arts and crafts; and interactive digital media". The report outlines information about cultural occupations and employers, the cultural sector's economic situation, the financial performance of the seven cultural domains, as well as data challenges and opportunities. While most of the information is national in scope, the report does provide some provincial tables.

Based on a literature review, 39 key informant interviews, 15 focus group sessions and an online survey (completed by 2,698 cultural workers and employers), this report identifies key trends and issues regarding human resources in Canada's cultural sector and provides recommendations for addressing human resource challenges.

Based on a survey and interviews with artists in Los Angeles and San Francisco, this report examines artists' work patterns in three separate but related spheres: the commercial sector, the non-profit sector, and the community sector. The authors argue that artists' "uniquely high self-employment rates and long, often slow, and challenging career paths require a singular set of institutional supports and policies".

Canadian Cultural Labour in the Era of the Creative Economy

Acknowledging that "artists and cultural-creative workers manage complex work flows, interruptions, part-time contracts, transitions, and unpaid work" (which leads to a lack of income security), this report explores "new ideas for income security initiatives for flexible labour – a growing part of the new economy". The report argues that "the key to promoting the sector ... is a framework that contains rules for creative labour processes and offers special protection as well as employment and income security to the creative work force".

In 2009, the Senior Artists Research Project was launched to investigate the circumstances, situation, needs and interests of elder artists. There were three components to the research project, including research into relevant international models of support for elder artists, the situation of Canadian elder artists, and services that currently exist for elder artists in Canada. The research reports related to senior artists are available on the Hill Strategies site (http://www.hillstrategies.com/content/senior-artists-research-project-0), while further information about the organization to assist artists in their senior years is available on the SARP page on the Dancer Transition Resource Centre's website (http://www.dtrc.ca/sarp/).

Recognizing that there is a lack of "specific information or research on the multiple job-holding of artists", this report explores the different types of engagement that artists have in the cultural sector as well as the relationship between artistic work and other paid work. The goal of the report is to provide artists with useful information in thinking about their career paths and managing their complex careers.

This report finds that 698,000 Canadians age 15 or older volunteered 73.5 million hours in arts and culture organizations in 2007. The 73.5 million hours volunteered in arts and culture organizations is equivalent to about 38,000 full-time, full-year jobs, valued at about $1.1 billion. About 1.3 million Canadians volunteered in arts and culture organizations, donated money to them, or did both in 2007. This represents 5.0% of all Canadians 15 years of age or older.

Based on a national survey of 218 arts organizations, this report provides data about salary levels for 21 management and administrative positions in Canadian non-profit arts organizations in 2008. Unfortunately, the report does not provide an estimate of the margin of error, given the number of survey respondents. This is a major limitation on any interpretation of the results.