Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Creative class, cities, people, neighbourhoods

Mark J. Stern, University of Pennsylvania

According to this presentation, the cultural sector can be seen as an ecosystem "that is central to the 'architecture of community'", especially four key community dimensions: social capital, public assets, market relations, and the flows of information, capital and people.

Impacts and Insights from Three Case Studies drawn from Artspace Projects’ Earliest Developments

This report examines the social, economic and physical impacts of two artists' cooperatives and a centre for visual arts in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. The report finds that "these artist spaces have produced clear benefits for in-house arts tenants and the surrounding neighborhood and region". More specifically, the study "found evidence that these artist spaces support, attract, and help retain artist entrepreneurs who enhance the regions' economic competitiveness". Specific economic and social benefits include drawing visitors to the area (who engage in ancillary spending), increasing civic involvement and safety, as well as "providing new spaces open to the public".

This report provides an analysis of artists residing in small and rural municipalities in Canada. One-quarter of the 140,000 artists in Canada reside in small and rural municipalities (36,500 artists, or 26%). West Bolton (in Quebec's Eastern Townships) is the only municipality in Canada with over 10% of its labour force in arts occupations.

This report summarizes the results of three forums in Ontario (Brockville, Chatham and Minett / Muskoka) about municipal cultural planning. The forums were designed to "build awareness of the value and economic development opportunity" presented by cultural planning, to demonstrate community examples and success stories, as well as to identify tools and barriers in implementing municipal cultural planning.
An International English-Language Literature Review and Inventory of Resources

The literature review in the Creative City Network of Canada series of reports on Developing and Revitalizing Rural Communities through Arts and Creativity examines the nature of cultural activity in rural communities, the community context for arts development, the role of the arts in economic development, and governance strategies.

Summary Overview

The Creative City Network of Canada commissioned a series of reports on Developing and Revitalizing Rural Communities through Arts and Creativity. The summary overview of these reports sets the context: "As rural communities re-envision and reposition themselves, they are seeking to revitalize, diversity their economic base, enhance their quality of life, and reinvent themselves for new functions and roles."

This report outlines the nature of the emerging creative economy, where "human creativity is a defining feature of contemporary life". The report identifies four "critical success factors in building a successful creative economy": (1) leadership and participation; (2) infrastructure; (3) awareness and education; and (4) investment and policy.
For Ontario to become a "world leader in the creative age", this report argues that building prosperity for all Ontarians will require "drawing more broadly on the creative skills of our people and workforce, developing stronger clustered industries, and harnessing the creative potential of current and future generations".
Compendium of Research Papers
The International Forum on the Creative Economy, a two-day forum in Gatineau, Quebec in March 2008, provides "evidence on the current and future economic forces and trends impacting the innovation, creative, and knowledge-based economies".
This study provides information about professional development practices in Ontario's cultural sector, including data about "how much training is pursued, the types of training, and who is paying for it".