Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Creative class, cities, people, neighbourhoods

Based on interviews with 14 technology professionals as well as a literature review of evidence related to music and skills development, this report (supported by Music Canada) contends that rich music environments help attract high-technology jobs to local areas. According to the study, music helps develop many skills that are critical for high-tech workers.

29 (3), 379-391, January 2010

The authors of this article argue that, despite increasing attention to creative cities and cultural planning, “knowledge about what works at various urban and regional scales is sorely lacking”. The authors highlight the relative lack of research “evaluating the efficacy of specific cultural strategies” designed to improve local cultural development.

Based on a literature review and several case studies, this report examines culture-led placemaking and "its contributions to livability, economic revitalization, creative entrepreneurship, and cultural industries". The study indicates that creative placemaking efforts are "using arts and culture to animate downtowns and neighborhoods, to stoke their creative industries, to stabilize population and jobs, and to attract new residents and businesses" to small and large communities.

This symposium, organized as part of Winnipeg's Cultural Capital of Canada 2010 activities, was designed to "deliberate and debate the current and future relationships of art and design to city-making".

Kelly Hill recently conducted a number of presentations in smaller cities, including St. John's, St. Catharines and Barrie. These presentations provide some insights into the situation of arts and culture in smaller and regional centres.

This briefing paper, written for generalist planners, highlights how "arts and culture strategies help to reveal and enhance the underlying identity – the unique meaning, value, and character" – of a community.

How arts and culture can tackle economic, social and democratic engagement challenges in smaller cities

This discussion paper provides British examples of how the arts and culture sector can help stimulate and sustain economic growth, build a sense of shared identity, promote community cohesion, and help address challenges regarding infrastructure and skill levels.

Canadian Cultural Labour in the Era of the Creative Economy

Acknowledging that "artists and cultural-creative workers manage complex work flows, interruptions, part-time contracts, transitions, and unpaid work" (which leads to a lack of income security), this report explores "new ideas for income security initiatives for flexible labour – a growing part of the new economy". The report argues that "the key to promoting the sector ... is a framework that contains rules for creative labour processes and offers special protection as well as employment and income security to the creative work force".

Toronto Artscape

This presentation provides lists of the "base elements of infrastructure" that may enhance creative neighbourhoods. The live/work and creation/production spaces highlighted in the report include artist live-work spaces, artist coops or lodges, artist studios, retail spaces, media or recording studios, soundstages, production workshops and rehearsal spaces.

The report provides an analysis of artists residing in various postal regions – "neighbourhoods" – in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver in 2006. The report provides lists of the ten neighbourhoods with the highest concentration of artists in each city. Nearly 22,000 artists live in the 50 neighbourhoods in the five cities' top ten lists. This represents 41% of the artists in the five cities and 16% of all artists in Canada. Since 41% of all artists in the five cities reside in the most artistic neighbourhoods, the report notes that cultural development in cities is partly an issue of neighbourhood development.