Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts funding & finances

This report provides “an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production up to the end of 2010/11 in both the English- and French- language markets”. Many challenges related to documentary production are highlighted in the report. Most significantly, “Canadian documentary production is facing its steepest decline in production volume in almost a decade”, with a 21% decrease in production value and a 23% decrease in the number of documentary projects between 2008/09 and 2010/11.

Based on data from 50 members of Orchestras Canada, this report highlights changes in the situation of orchestras between 2004-05 and 2011-12, including revenues, expenses, surplus, performances, and attendance. While overall revenues and expenses increased (by 13% and 12% respectively), the report notes that “the overall revenue mix for the 50 orchestras did not change between 2004-05 and 2011-12." A more detailed analysis of revenue sources shows that “fundraising from individuals has become an increasingly important component of orchestra revenues (41% increase between 2004-05 and 2011-12)”.

A component of the Canada Dance Mapping Study – which seeks to provide a comprehensive profile of the breadth and dance activity across Canada – this literature review examines a number of research sources regarding the state of dance in Canada, including professional, non-professional, and social dance. The literature review is organized around six key themes: dance policy, economics, ecology, social aspects, digital technologies, and artistic expression.

Executive Summary

Based on a 2012 survey of 180 community investment professionals working in Canadian businesses, this report examines how businesses support community initiatives. The survey found that the four most common types of community investments are “contributing money to community organizations; providing contributions through sponsorships or marketing activities; providing in-kind resources, services and goods; and supporting employee volunteering programs”.

A summary of findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on a survey of 1,500 businesses, this fact sheet highlights select findings regarding the corporate community investment practices of all responding businesses as well as a breakout of 93 larger corporations (revenues over $25 million). The survey found that 76% of all businesses provided funding to not-for-profit organizations. Almost all large corporations (97%) did so. The broader business community gave a slightly larger percentage of their pre-tax profits (1.25%) than large corporations (1%).

Findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community (presentation)

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this presentation provides detailed findings regarding corporate community investment practices, motivations, and challenges. Regarding business views of not-for-profit organizations, the survey found that 73% of all businesses agree that “charities and nonprofits generally improve the quality of life in Canada”.

Further findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this report examines which industry sectors tend to provide different types of support. The goal of this information is to help not-for-profit organizations “tailor their corporate fundraising to the sectors that are most likely to be responsive to their specific needs”.

This report examines all cultural building projects in the United States between 1994 and 2008 based on a number of research methods. Overall, the researchers identified 725 cultural building projects started between 1994 and 2008, with a total cost of nearly $16 billion. One-half of the cultural building projects were multi-use performing arts centres, 39% were museums, and 11% were theatre-only projects.

Discussion paper
The goal of this discussion paper is to provide “a high-level overview of current thinking and practices in the sphere of public engagement in the arts”. The report indicates that public engagement is increasingly seen to be important “for cultural rights, arts education, expressive life, citizen participation, social cohesion, and cultural diversity”.

Statistics Canada recently released summary data on heritage institutions in 2010, including for-profit and not-for-profit heritage organizations such as art galleries, museums, historic sites, zoos and botanical gardens. The total operating revenues of all heritage organizations were $1.3 billion in 2010, a 3.4% increase from 2009. Total operating expenditures were $1.2 billion, leaving a small surplus of 3.1% of total revenues.