Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts funding & finances

This report examines all cultural building projects in the United States between 1994 and 2008 based on a number of research methods. Overall, the researchers identified 725 cultural building projects started between 1994 and 2008, with a total cost of nearly $16 billion. One-half of the cultural building projects were multi-use performing arts centres, 39% were museums, and 11% were theatre-only projects.

Discussion paper
The goal of this discussion paper is to provide “a high-level overview of current thinking and practices in the sphere of public engagement in the arts”. The report indicates that public engagement is increasingly seen to be important “for cultural rights, arts education, expressive life, citizen participation, social cohesion, and cultural diversity”.

Statistics Canada recently released summary data on heritage institutions in 2010, including for-profit and not-for-profit heritage organizations such as art galleries, museums, historic sites, zoos and botanical gardens. The total operating revenues of all heritage organizations were $1.3 billion in 2010, a 3.4% increase from 2009. Total operating expenditures were $1.2 billion, leaving a small surplus of 3.1% of total revenues.

Based on a literature review, a survey of 85 organizations, in-depth interviews, and an analysis of aggregated financial and statistical information, this report examines the role and place of artist-run centre within the visual arts sector. The report concludes that artist-run centres "play a central role, supporting the production and critical advancement of emergent artistic practices and contributing to the development of the careers of artists and arts administrators".

Prepared by David Poole

This discussion paper, intended for use by arts funding bodies, provides a useful overview of "current knowledge on the theme of digital transition and the impact of new technology on the arts". The paper indicates that "the electronic, networked and interactive nature of the digital world has a significant impact on the arts".

This report and two presentations were prepared by Kelly Hill using data submitted by 50 members of Orchestras Canada. Total revenues of the 50 orchestras equalled $158 million in 2010-11, with earned revenues accounting for the largest share (37%), followed by government revenues (34%) and private sector fundraising (29%). The breakdown of revenues by source remained fairly stable between 2004-05 and 2010-11.

Statistics Canada's annual performing arts survey provided brief text highlights and preliminary data of the situation of performing arts organizations in 2010. Hill Strategies has analyzed the detailed data, with a particular focus on not-for-profit organizations, for this issue of the Arts Research Monitor. Operating revenues were $1.55 billion for all performing arts groups in 2010, an 11.0% increase from 2009. In 2010, not-for-profit performing arts organizations in Canada had operating revenues of $752 million, representing 49% of the $1.55 billion sector total and an 8.8% increase from 2009.

Prepared by the Centre for Innovation in Culture and Arts in Canada (CICAC)

Based on a literature review and environmental scan, this brief synthesis examines "how equity is defined, understood, implemented and measured within the Canadian arts ecology, as well as within a broader international arts context". The study also attempts to identify sustainable practices as well as important questions for future research.

(Les dépenses culturelles des municipalités en 2010)

This report provides some interesting findings on cultural spending by Quebec municipalities. In the report, cultural spending includes: libraries; arts and letters; heritage, public art and design; cultural festivals and events; events with a cultural component; cultural and scientific leisure activities; conservation of historical archives; and other cultural expenditures. In 2010, Quebec municipalities spent $740 million on culture, representing 4.9% of all municipal expenditures.

A study prepared for the City of Vancouver, the City of Calgary, the City of Toronto, the City of Ottawa and the Ville de Montréal

This report compares the cultural investment in five of Canada's largest cities: Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal. Cultural staff members in each city were instrumental in the process, both in working toward a common definition of culture and in capturing local data (which were reviewed and vetted by Hill Strategies).