Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts funding & finances

Based largely on a 2011 survey of 502 music company representatives and 1,094 artists in Canada’s independent music industry, this report attempts to “determine the breadth and scope of the Canadian-owned, independent music industry as a whole and to measure its importance to both national and provincial economies”. The survey results show that total revenues of independent music companies were $292 million in 2011. More than one-half of independent music companies (60%) have less than $50,000 in revenues, and almost one-half are sole proprietorships (46%).

First edition – for consultation

This Australian report aims “to deliver a tool to enable governments, the [cultural] sector and the community to monitor the achievements of the sector, the role arts and culture play in economic and social agendas, and the vitality and cultural impact of Australian arts and cultural output”. Based on “extensive research on international developments in cultural measurement”, the study examines what indicators are available and relevant in an Australian context. Sixteen high-level cultural indicators, grouped under three main themes, are outlined in the report.

An Annual Measure of the Vitality of Arts and Culture in the United States: 1998-2010

The National Arts Index attempts to measure “the health and vitality of the arts in the U.S.” The report, released in 2012 and based largely on 2010 data, incorporates 83 equally-weighted national indicators across four key dimensions: financial flows; capacity; arts participation; and competitiveness. The report covers data from 1998 to 2010, with the base year being 2003 (when the index was set to 100). In 2010, the National Arts Index value was 96.7, the second-lowest level since 1998. The highest index values occurred in 2007 (103.4) and 1999 (103.3).

This report provides “an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production up to the end of 2010/11 in both the English- and French- language markets”. Many challenges related to documentary production are highlighted in the report. Most significantly, “Canadian documentary production is facing its steepest decline in production volume in almost a decade”, with a 21% decrease in production value and a 23% decrease in the number of documentary projects between 2008/09 and 2010/11.

Based on data from 50 members of Orchestras Canada, this report highlights changes in the situation of orchestras between 2004-05 and 2011-12, including revenues, expenses, surplus, performances, and attendance. While overall revenues and expenses increased (by 13% and 12% respectively), the report notes that “the overall revenue mix for the 50 orchestras did not change between 2004-05 and 2011-12." A more detailed analysis of revenue sources shows that “fundraising from individuals has become an increasingly important component of orchestra revenues (41% increase between 2004-05 and 2011-12)”.

A component of the Canada Dance Mapping Study – which seeks to provide a comprehensive profile of the breadth and dance activity across Canada – this literature review examines a number of research sources regarding the state of dance in Canada, including professional, non-professional, and social dance. The literature review is organized around six key themes: dance policy, economics, ecology, social aspects, digital technologies, and artistic expression.

Executive Summary

Based on a 2012 survey of 180 community investment professionals working in Canadian businesses, this report examines how businesses support community initiatives. The survey found that the four most common types of community investments are “contributing money to community organizations; providing contributions through sponsorships or marketing activities; providing in-kind resources, services and goods; and supporting employee volunteering programs”.

A summary of findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on a survey of 1,500 businesses, this fact sheet highlights select findings regarding the corporate community investment practices of all responding businesses as well as a breakout of 93 larger corporations (revenues over $25 million). The survey found that 76% of all businesses provided funding to not-for-profit organizations. Almost all large corporations (97%) did so. The broader business community gave a slightly larger percentage of their pre-tax profits (1.25%) than large corporations (1%).

Findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community (presentation)

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this presentation provides detailed findings regarding corporate community investment practices, motivations, and challenges. Regarding business views of not-for-profit organizations, the survey found that 73% of all businesses agree that “charities and nonprofits generally improve the quality of life in Canada”.

Further findings from the Canada Survey of Business Contributions to Community

Based on the same survey of the community investment practices of 1,500 businesses as other reports from Imagine Canada, this report examines which industry sectors tend to provide different types of support. The goal of this information is to help not-for-profit organizations “tailor their corporate fundraising to the sectors that are most likely to be responsive to their specific needs”.