Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts funding & finances

2013 Arts Facts using CADAC Data

A brief summary accompanies two longer reports that highlight the situation of 49 media arts presenters and 45 production centres “that receive recurring funding from the Media Arts Section of the Canada Council for the Arts”, based on financial and statistical data reported to CADAC (Canadian Arts Data / Données sur les arts au Canada).

Sector Developers for Independent Theatre in Toronto

This report, “largely based on 29 interviews with staff, participants and related stakeholders”, explores two initiatives that support independent theatre makers in Toronto: Generator (“a capacity building and mentoring organization for independent performance makers”) and The RISER Project (“a collaborative and charitable approach to production and presentation”).

Noting that “social finance tools create opportunities for investors to finance projects that realize both financial and social returns”, this report outlines existing literature related to social finance and how it might be applied toward the arts.

An In-Depth Look at Perceptions and Attitudes about the Arts in America

Based on an online survey of 3,020 American adults in December 2015, this report summarizes responses to a series of questions about arts engagement, education, government funding, and the benefits to individuals and communities.

(Les arts et la culture au Québec : Portrait de la perception des Québécois)

Based on an online survey of 1,410 Quebec residents (18 and older) in September 2015, this report highlights the public’s perceptions of artists, their role in society, impacts of the cultural sector, and the governmental role in supporting culture. In general, 77% of respondents believe that the arts and culture are important to them. Annual arts participation rates are 78% for cinemas, 71% for the performing arts, and 49% for museums.

This report presents the results of a random telephone survey of 1,004 Ontario residents (18 and older) in early March 2017, bearing a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. Respondents were asked a series of questions about their perceptions of the arts in Ontario, with specific questions regarding the quality of life, well-being, identity, belonging, and public arts funding. A vast majority of Ontarians believe that the arts are somewhat or very important to their own lives (85%) and to life in their community (90%).

The Ottawa Insights series examines key data related to various “themes” that are important to local quality of life, including the arts and culture. The report provides information related to four areas of the arts and culture: Public participation; Programs and facilities; Investment in the arts; The arts and recreation economy.

Based on municipal submissions that have been reviewed by their peers, this report compares municipal expenses related to 36 service areas, one of which is culture. In 2015, the median overall cost for cultural services in the eight cities was $26.84 per capita. Expenses for cultural services were highest in Montreal ($43.79), followed by Ottawa ($33.21) and Toronto ($31.81). Median grants for the arts, heritage, and festivals were $8.86 per capita, again highest in Montreal ($23.16), followed by Thunder Bay ($17.59) and Ottawa ($9.70).

This report attempts to provide a “health check” for the arts in England. Between 2007/08 and 2013/14, the overall arts index increased from 99 to 111. Most of the increase in the index occurred between 2007 and 2011.

The 2016 report of the National Arts Index, based largely on data from 2013, highlights the “post-recession recovery” of the arts using 81 equally-weighted national indicators across four key dimensions: financial flows; capacity; arts participation; and competitiveness. The overall index value was 99.8 in 2013, higher than any year since 2009 but only back to the levels in the first two years measured (2002 and 2003). In other words, based on this index, the arts in America are in roughly the same health as in 2002.