Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts education

An analysis of the educational backgrounds of working artists and the labour market activities of arts program graduates in Canada

Based on the 2013 National Graduates Survey and the 2011 National Household Survey, this report examines the labour force situation of arts graduates and the post-secondary education of artists in Canada.

Based on a non-random online survey of about 500 Toronto residents as well as three focus group sessions, this report indicates that 97% of respondents “see at least one benefit of the arts to the City of Toronto”. The two most commonly selected benefits to the City were attracting tourists (79%) and highlighting the city’s cultural diversity (71%).

This report provides “evidence-based insights into the health of U.S. arts and cultural organizations”, based on more than 55,000 arts and cultural organizations. The report is very detailed, with data related to 128 indices and in-depth reporting on 26 indices.

Based on various Statistics Canada sources, this brief fact sheet examines the number of theatre companies in Canada, their revenues and expenditures, theatre’s contribution to the economy, public spending on tickets, as well as the number and earnings of theatre artists and students.

Annual Report 2014

Based on three years of surveys of "over 92,000 arts alumni … from 153 institutions – 140 post-secondary institutions and 13 arts high schools”, this report examines the situation of graduates of arts and arts-related programs. Three key findings from the surveys are that arts-related graduates “have found meaningful employment, are satisfied with their lives, and are pleased that they chose to go to an arts school”.

A National Study on the Lives of Art Graduates and Working Artists

Using data from two large-scale American surveys, this report examines the situation of the estimated 1.2 million working artists and 2 million arts graduates over 25 years of age. One of the key findings of the report is that only 200,000 Americans are both arts graduates and working artists (representing 10% of all arts graduates and 16% of all working artists). In other words, “the majority of arts graduates work in non-arts fields”.

Commissioned by the Visual Arts Alliance with a financial contribution from the Canada Council for the Arts, this literature review attempts to provide a synthesis of existing research in the visual arts in Canada and to identify gaps in this research. The report notes that the goal was not to outline the state of the visual arts sector in Canada but rather the state of research into the visual arts in the country.

Summary Report

Based on discussions at the Kingston Colloquium of the Visual Arts Alliance in 2011, this position paper attempts to identify “ways to make the visual arts more central in the lives of Canada and Canadians”. Five key themes emerged from the colloquium debates.

Key findings

The goal of the research outlined in this presentation was to provide “reliable, detailed data on public art galleries across Ontario”, thereby influencing art gallery sector analysis as well as organizations’ benchmarking and future planning.

This English literature review was intended as a summary of “the strength of the evidence base between 2010–13 about the economic, social, health and wellbeing, education, lifelong learning and environmental impacts and outcomes of arts and culture in England”. Based on the 90 reports examined, the literature review found that the “arts and culture play an important role in promoting social and economic goals through local regeneration, attracting tourists, the development of talent and innovation, improving health and wellbeing, and delivering essential services”.