Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts attendance & participation

An Analysis of Attendance at Art Galleries, Theatres, Classical Music Performances, Popular Music Performances, and Cultural Festivals
Based on Statistics Canada’s 2010 General Social Survey, an in-depth telephone survey of about 7,500 Canadians 15 or older, this report concludes that “there is an arts-interested public that transcends demographics”. For example, the report indicates that “someone with less than a secondary school diploma was not very likely to visit an art gallery in 2010: only 20% did so. However, someone with the same level of education who attended a classical concert in 2010 was much more likely to visit an art gallery: 44% did so in 2010”.
Based on large-scale surveys of English adults, this report aims to provide “a tool to inform marketing and audience development plans for arts organisations, local authorities and other agencies working in the arts”. The report outlines 13 arts consumer segments, based on patterns of arts consumption, attitudes toward the arts, leisure pursuits, socio-demographic factors, media consumption, and lifestyle elements. The segments, although tailored to English adults, might also be useful for Canadian artists and arts organizations in thinking about the possible attitudes, opinions, and motivations of their current and potential audiences.
Discussion paper
The goal of this discussion paper is to provide “a high-level overview of current thinking and practices in the sphere of public engagement in the arts”. The report indicates that public engagement is increasingly seen to be important “for cultural rights, arts education, expressive life, citizen participation, social cohesion, and cultural diversity”.
(United Kingdom)

Based on 11,111 on-site interviews in the summer of 2011 with visitors at 49 British art galleries, this report highlights a range of characteristics of art gallery visitors. Despite a caution regarding representation of all gallery visitors, the report does provide some interesting findings about survey respondents.

This study attempts to address three key research questions: 1) "How is digital media currently used in theatres both in Ontario and beyond and what is the potential for expanding its use?"; 2) "How can the content developed for the stage be adapted and repurposed for use on digital media platforms?"; and 3) "How can theatres use digital media to reach a wider and more demographically diverse audience?"

Prepared by David Poole

This discussion paper, intended for use by arts funding bodies, provides a useful overview of "current knowledge on the theme of digital transition and the impact of new technology on the arts". The paper indicates that "the electronic, networked and interactive nature of the digital world has a significant impact on the arts".

Evidence from the Taking Part survey on how childhood involvement in the arts affects arts engagement in adulthood

This report examines the relationship between childhood arts experiences and adult arts participation, based on a survey of 13,500 English adults who were asked to recall their childhood arts experiences. Overall, the report found that "being exposed to arts events and encouraged to participate in arts activities when growing up indeed makes a positive contribution to the chances of people developing a life-long interest in and active relationship with the arts".

Findings from Four Longitudinal Studies

Based on four longitudinal datasets, this American report examines the association between in-depth arts engagement and academic or civic outcomes for at-risk youth. The report notes that high-arts students fare at least as well as low-arts students on almost all indicators of academic achievement and civic engagement, and significantly better than low-arts students on a number of indicators.

This report and two presentations were prepared by Kelly Hill using data submitted by 50 members of Orchestras Canada. Total revenues of the 50 orchestras equalled $158 million in 2010-11, with earned revenues accounting for the largest share (37%), followed by government revenues (34%) and private sector fundraising (29%). The breakdown of revenues by source remained fairly stable between 2004-05 and 2010-11.

Statistics Canada's annual performing arts survey provided brief text highlights and preliminary data of the situation of performing arts organizations in 2010. Hill Strategies has analyzed the detailed data, with a particular focus on not-for-profit organizations, for this issue of the Arts Research Monitor. Operating revenues were $1.55 billion for all performing arts groups in 2010, an 11.0% increase from 2009. In 2010, not-for-profit performing arts organizations in Canada had operating revenues of $752 million, representing 49% of the $1.55 billion sector total and an 8.8% increase from 2009.