Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Aboriginal arts and culturally diverse arts

This brief report highlights the fact that cultural practices are important for “the wellness, health, and healing of Aboriginal peoples and communities”. The report indicates that the arts may have particular importance for Aboriginal Peoples in many ways.

A Report on the Socio-Economic Status of Canadian Visual Artists

This series of brief web articles aims to depict “the socio-economic conditions faced by Canadian resident professional visual artists” in 2012, with specific articles on ethnicity, sex, and gallery representation. The survey found that nearly one-half of Canadian visual artists lost money on their artistic practice in 2012 (47%). The average personal income of visual artists was $29,300, the largest portions of which came from art-related employment (average of $19,200) and non-art-related employment (average of $5,700). After adjusting for inflation, the overall average income in 2012 was 6% higher than the 2007 level ($27,600).

Canadian Evidence regarding the Relationship between the Arts and the Quality of Life, Well-being, Health, Education, Society, and the Economy

This literature review, conducted in May 2014, synthesized the findings of 46 Canadian research articles regarding the “holistic case for the arts, i.e., outcomes of the arts related to the quality of life, well-being, health, society, education, and the economy”. The report concluded that “there are a myriad of potential benefits of the arts”. That being said, the report cautions that “studies of causal links (rather than statistical associations) are very challenging to conduct”.

A Study of Three Toronto Neighbourhoods

Based on a two-year research process, this study attempted to “gain a better understanding of how residents engage with the arts at a community level, explore barriers to arts access, and identify ways to strengthen local arts engagement”. The study’s 17 researchers made “300 connections” including interviews, focus groups, and surveys with 191 “residents, artists, arts groups and social service organizations” in three Toronto neighbourhoods: Malvern, St. James Town, and Weston Mount Dennis.

The report notes that, other than a few differences, diverse Canadians attended at similar rates to other Canadians. Based on these findings, the report concludes that “the range of arts offerings in Canada – from art galleries, classical concerts, and theatre performances to pop concerts and cultural festivals – manages to attract most Canadians to at least one type of activity."

Canadian Social Trends no. 90

This study examines cultural and sports participation by off-reserve Aboriginal children between 6 and 14 years of age, based on the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (a survey with 11,940 respondents). As reported by parents, the survey found that 40% of Aboriginal children participated at least occasionally “in culturally related activities” (no specific definition provided), while 69% participated at least once a week in sports-related activities.

Prepared by the Centre for Innovation in Culture and Arts in Canada (CICAC)

Based on a literature review and environmental scan, this brief synthesis examines "how equity is defined, understood, implemented and measured within the Canadian arts ecology, as well as within a broader international arts context". The study also attempts to identify sustainable practices as well as important questions for future research.

This report examines the connections between Aboriginal languages and art in Canada, based on interviews, talking circles, a survey of over 300 Aboriginal artists, a review of Canada Council application files, and other available data. The report notes that, as taught by the Elders, "language is integral to the development of art practices. Similarly, art practice is a form of communication that is intertwined with or created alongside language, and is intrinsic to the development of culture and heritage in Aboriginal societies."

The Value of Presenting: A Study of Arts Presentation in Canada

This brief report summarizes select findings from a survey of 288 Canadian performing arts presenters. The report acknowledges that, "long before European explorers came to Canada, Aboriginal peoples had a rich, expressive artistic life including dance, theatre, storytelling, music – all inseparable from every other aspect of life."

A Knowledge and Literature Review

Based on interviews and other research information (both oral and written), this report has the goal of expanding understanding of Aboriginal art in "the mainstream art world".