Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Other topics

Based on experiences conducting demographic surveys of arts organizations in Chicago, Minnesota, Los Angeles, and Houston, this article outlines key findings regarding the measurement of identity-related characteristics (but not actual survey results). The surveys focused on five characteristics: race/ethnicity, age, gender, LBGTQ status, and disability status.

Based predominantly on a survey of 2,487 creative sector workers in the United Kingdom (called the Panic! Survey), this report concludes that “the cultural and creative industries are marked by significant inequalities”.

This report summarizes the diversity within English arts organizations in 2016/17, based largely on an annual Arts Council England survey completed by larger client organizations. The report’s diversity statistics include a focus on disability, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

Based on a national survey to which 436 arts organizations responded in late 2017, this report provides information about salaries and benefits in 21 management and administrative positions in Canadian not-for-profit arts organizations.

“Intended to contribute to more effective practice in cultural development planning”, this online resource could be used either to help create a new local cultural plan or assess an existing plan. The framework provides measurable outcomes for cultural activity in each of five domains (cultural, economic, environmental, governance and social).

(Les dépenses en culture des municipalités en 2015)

Quebec’s cultural observatory provides an annual summary of a survey of municipalities regarding their spending on the arts, culture, and heritage. Quebec municipalities’ operating expenditures on culture totalled $909 million in 2015, representing 4.8% of total municipal operating expenditures.

This report compares 173 measures of municipal activities in 36 service areas in 2016, one of which is culture. Overall, 15 municipalities from five provinces participated, but only eight reported data on their cultural grants and overall cultural expenditures (Calgary, Greater Sudbury, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Thunder Bay, Toronto, and Windsor).

With comparisons to seven other Canadian municipalities

This report summarizes non-financial supports provided by eight Canadian municipalities to the cultural sector in 2016, based on in-depth discussions and a survey of cultural staff members in the municipalities, which included District of Sechelt (B.C.), Edmonton, Saskatoon, London, Brampton, Mississauga, Greater Sudbury, and Halifax Regional Municipality. Eleven categories of non-monetary, or “indirect”, cultural investments were identified.

This brief report focuses on a few studies related to the social and economic benefits of cultural engagement. The review found that “people benefit in multiple ways when there is a vibrant arts and culture base in their community and that taking part or engaging in arts and cultural activities1 has certain positive effects on individual well-being”.

The report indicates that there is “strong support that artistic practice is associated with higher levels of life satisfaction, a more positive self image, less anxiety about change, a more tolerant and open approach to diverse others, and, in some cases, less focus on materialistic values and the acquisition of goods”. For the most part, the findings relate to amateur rather than professional arts practice.