Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Benefits & Impacts

Based on the 2012 U.S. General Social Survey, this report provides a detailed examination of the motivations of arts attendees (the 54% of Americans who attended at least one exhibition or performance during the previous year) and the barriers facing “interested non-attendees” (the 13% who did not attend a visual or performing arts event during the previous year but wanted to go to at least one exhibition or live performance).

Understanding How Participation in Arts and Culture Can Affect our Values

Taking the form of a core essay and a number of critical responses, the report attempts to start “a dialogue about how arts and culture impact on our values”, including “deep values” such as “self-acceptance, affiliation, community feeling, freedom, creativity, self-respect, equality, [and] unity with nature”.

New Citizens, Sports & Belonging

While not related to the arts, this report is an interesting example of research into new citizens’ participation in Canadian life, in the world of sports. The report is based on a survey of 4,157 new citizens residing in urban areas who have participated “in the Institute for Canadian Citizenship’s Cultural Access Pass program”, focus groups in eight Canadian cities, and a literature review of sports organizations’ focus on immigration and diversity.

Based on a non-random online survey of about 500 Toronto residents as well as three focus group sessions, this report indicates that 97% of respondents “see at least one benefit of the arts to the City of Toronto”. The two most commonly selected benefits to the City were attracting tourists (79%) and highlighting the city’s cultural diversity (71%).

An Overview of Current Neuroscience Research

This document provides a useful summary of recent neuroscience research on the impacts of music on mental health and well-being. The report indicates that “neuroscientists are demonstrating that there is a causal connection between music study and cognitive growth”.

The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) examines the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage in Canada, the provinces, and the territories. This link provides a summary of estimates of the economic benefits of culture in the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut.

The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) examines the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage in Canada, the provinces, and the territories. This link provides a summary of estimates of the economic benefits of culture in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) examines the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage in Canada, the provinces, and the territories. This link provides a summary of estimates of the economic benefits of culture in Ontario and Quebec.

The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) examines the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage in Canada, the provinces, and the territories. This link provides a summary of estimates of the economic benefits of culture in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba.

The Culture Satellite Account (CSA) examines the direct economic and employment impact of the arts, culture, and heritage in Canada, the provinces, and the territories. Updated national estimates indicate that the direct economic impact of culture industries was $53.4 billion in Canada in 2010, or 3.4% of Canada's Gross Domestic Product (GDP). In 2010, there were 707,000 jobs directly related to culture industries, or 4.1% of total employment.