Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Economic impacts of the arts

Consumer Spending on Culture shows that Canadian consumers spent $22.8 billion on cultural goods and services in 2003, an amount that is greater than consumer spending on tobacco, alcohol and games of chance combined. The $22.8 billion in consumer spending is over three times larger than the $7.4 billion spent on culture in by all levels of government in 2002/03. The report also shows that consumer spending on live performing arts events ($980 million) is nearly double the spending on live sporting events ($530 million).
The Canada Council's advocacy resource kit contains sections on key advocacy messages, advocacy tips and strategies, the achievements of artists and cultural organizations in a range of sectors, community and economic impacts of the arts, the contributions of Aboriginal and culturally diverse artists, and more. Within each of these areas, the kit contains a variety of statistics, resources and arguments to help arts advocates.
Some of the many themes of the report include: the clear impact of childhood arts experiences on adult participation and overall quality of life; the interrelatedness of the arts ecosystem; the ways in which people access one artform through another; the fact that people derive significant value from personal curating; and how "personal connections with artists can bridge a relevance gap and ignite latent arts interests and inspire participation".

This report, through a literature review of the benefits of the arts, attempts "to engage the arts community and the public in a new dialogue about the value of the arts, to stimulate further research, and to help public and private policymakers reach informed decisions".

These four Statistics Canada products examine the culture sector's contribution to Gross Domestic Product and employment in various Canadian jurisdictions.

Developed as part of the Voluntary Sector Initiative, the Satellite Account of Nonprofit Institutions and Volunteering is a new and permanent feature of Canada's standard economic accounts, providing information on the economic size and scope, revenue sources, expenditures, volunteer activity, and paid labour in the nonprofit sector.
Ann Markusen, Greg Schrock and Martina Cameron, University of Minnesota

The Artistic Dividend Revisited updates Markusen's 2003 study on The Artistic Dividend (see Arts Research Monitor Vol. 2 No 5) by providing information from the 2000 U.S. Census on arts occupation clusters (performing artists, visual artists, writers and musicians) and the location decision-making of artists.

To help artists, arts organizations, board members and other cultural supporters make the case for the arts and culture, the Canada Council has prepared an advocacy resource kit, available online in html, pdf or MS-Word format.
These web resources compiled by the Canadian Conference of the Arts provide information and statistics to help artists and cultural workers demonstrate the value of the arts and culture in Canada.
Prepared for the Ontario Trillium Foundation by Hill Strategies Research Inc.
The two fact sheets in this series highlight the economic impacts of 97 of Ontario's festivals and events, including non-profit organizations involved in culture, sports, recreation and community-based initiatives.