Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Arts discipline information

This academic article examines how Montreal’s historical and cultural attributes influence the development of networks among musicians and other workers in the city’s independent music industry. The study is based on 46 interviews with musicians and industry workers not affiliated with major labels. The interviewees indicated that “knowing the right people” and having a wide range of contacts were “vital” to their career development.

Also: Music Matters: How Music Education Helps Students Learn, Achieve, and Succeed

With 40 citations from a range of sources, this brief bulletin provides a useful summary of research findings regarding the benefits of arts education. Indicating that arts education is key “to ensuring students’ success in school, work, and life”, the research bulletin concludes that “every young person in America deserves a complete and competitive education that includes the arts”. With evidence from 23 music education research projects, a similar fact sheet indicates that “music education equips students with the foundational abilities to learn, to achieve in other core academic subjects, and to develop the capacities, skills and knowledge essential for lifelong success”.

This study examines “whether music training is associated with higher-level reading abilities such as reading comprehension” in 46 “normal-achieving” children between six and nine years of age. The study finds that “length of music training predicted reading comprehension performance even after controlling for age, socioeconomic status, auditory perception, full scale IQ, the number of hours that children spent reading per week, and word decoding skills”. Unlike previous research, the study did not find a correlation between music training and word decoding skills.

(Le développement des pratiques culturelles chez les enfants)

The most basic conclusion of this report from Quebec’s cultural observatory is that mothers who read tend to have children who read. The analysis is based on the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD), a yearly survey of a representative sample of parents of children born in Quebec in 1997-1998.

This report provides “an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production up to the end of 2010/11 in both the English- and French- language markets”. Many challenges related to documentary production are highlighted in the report. Most significantly, “Canadian documentary production is facing its steepest decline in production volume in almost a decade”, with a 21% decrease in production value and a 23% decrease in the number of documentary projects between 2008/09 and 2010/11.

Based on data from 50 members of Orchestras Canada, this report highlights changes in the situation of orchestras between 2004-05 and 2011-12, including revenues, expenses, surplus, performances, and attendance. While overall revenues and expenses increased (by 13% and 12% respectively), the report notes that “the overall revenue mix for the 50 orchestras did not change between 2004-05 and 2011-12." A more detailed analysis of revenue sources shows that “fundraising from individuals has become an increasingly important component of orchestra revenues (41% increase between 2004-05 and 2011-12)”.

(Les danseurs et chorégraphes québécois : un aperçu statistique)

This brief report outlines key statistics on dance artists in Quebec, based on a custom survey of 375 dancers and choreographers with at least two years of professional experience. The report estimates that the total number of professional dancers in Quebec is about 650, including 470 women (73%) and 180 men (27%).

A component of the Canada Dance Mapping Study – which seeks to provide a comprehensive profile of the breadth and dance activity across Canada – this literature review examines a number of research sources regarding the state of dance in Canada, including professional, non-professional, and social dance. The literature review is organized around six key themes: dance policy, economics, ecology, social aspects, digital technologies, and artistic expression.

This report examines all cultural building projects in the United States between 1994 and 2008 based on a number of research methods. Overall, the researchers identified 725 cultural building projects started between 1994 and 2008, with a total cost of nearly $16 billion. One-half of the cultural building projects were multi-use performing arts centres, 39% were museums, and 11% were theatre-only projects.

The Value of Presenting: A Study of Arts Presentation in Canada

In addition to providing a profile of performing arts presenters and summarizing research into arts attendance in Canada, this report examines potential benefits of the arts, including impacts on the quality of life, well-being, social engagement, health, education, and communities.