Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Performing arts

Research Note #102

This report examines the monetary and non-monetary value of the performing arts based on a number of different American data sources. The report finds that there are nearly 8,840 performing arts organizations in the United States (with at least one person on payroll). Collectively, these organizations had annual revenues of almost $13.6 billion and over 125,000 paid workers in 2007. Americans spent $14.5 billion on performing arts admissions in 2009. "On any given day, 1.5 million Americans attend arts performances, usually with family or friends."

Results from a 2011 Province-wide Study of the Arts Engagement Patterns of Ontario Adults

This report is based on a survey of 1,594 Ontario adults covering their personal practice, attendance and media-based consumption of 45 different arts activities. The report challenges "the arts community and its funders to consider the totality of engagement when looking to increase participation" and concludes that "increasing arts engagement in Ontario will require making new connections between different parts of the ecosystem and tapping into deep veins of cultural value".

This American report, based on a survey of nearly 7,500 dance attendees in the summer of 2010, probes how dance audience members engage with dance presentations. Based on both current and desired levels of involvement with dance, the researchers distilled five key factors in dance attendance: 1) Mental stimulation (i.e., intellectual and creative stimulation); 2) Nurturing (i.e., social and family fulfillment); 3) Repertoire-driven motivations (e.g., see "great works", new artists or new work); 4) Emotional and spiritual motivations; 5) Social bridging and bonding motivations (e.g., to grow closer to one's own culture or to learn about other cultures).

Participation, Appreciation, and Motivation

This report examines audience motivations for attending and experiences at 24 music festivals and concert series funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage's Arts Presentation Canada program in 2008-09. Regarding motivations for attendance, many respondents chose "overall enjoyment", as well as the "variety of musical styles" and the desire "to spend quality time with friends".

While Statistics Canada's performing arts survey provides information about performing arts companies, this survey provides some information about arts presenters and independent artists, along with sports presenters. However, the data in the survey is very limited.

Statistics Canada recently released summary data of performing arts organizations in 2009. Total revenues were $1.3 billion for all for-profit and not-for-profit performing arts groups in 2009, a 3.7% decrease from 2008 (not adjusted for inflation). Not-for-profit performing arts organizations in Canada had total revenues of $643 million in 2009, a 3.8% from 2008.

This report provides an examination of the challenges, needs and opportunities of Toronto-based mid-career contemporary dance creators. Based on an in-depth survey of 14 dancer-choreographers, the report notes that the mid-career dancers are on average 39 years old, with 18 years of professional dance experience and an average annual income of about $18,000.

Based on a compilation and analysis of existing statistics, this report provides detailed information about the cultural sector labour market, including seven cultural domains: "live performing arts; film, radio, TV, and broadcasting; music; heritage; books and periodicals; visual arts and crafts; and interactive digital media". The report outlines information about cultural occupations and employers, the cultural sector's economic situation, the financial performance of the seven cultural domains, as well as data challenges and opportunities. While most of the information is national in scope, the report does provide some provincial tables.

Based on a literature review, 39 key informant interviews, 15 focus group sessions and an online survey (completed by 2,698 cultural workers and employers), this report identifies key trends and issues regarding human resources in Canada's cultural sector and provides recommendations for addressing human resource challenges.

Based on a Statistics Canada survey of the spending habits of nearly 10,000 Canadian households in 2008, this report examines variations in performing arts spending between households, including differences in average spending and the percentage of households spending any money on live performing arts. The report found that total consumer spending on live performing arts was just over $1.4 billion in 2008, which is an average of $108 per Canadian household. Between 2001 and 2008, total consumer spending on live performances increased by 49% (after inflation).