Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Performing arts

A component of the Canada Dance Mapping Study – which seeks to provide a comprehensive profile of the breadth and dance activity across Canada – this literature review examines a number of research sources regarding the state of dance in Canada, including professional, non-professional, and social dance. The literature review is organized around six key themes: dance policy, economics, ecology, social aspects, digital technologies, and artistic expression.

This report examines all cultural building projects in the United States between 1994 and 2008 based on a number of research methods. Overall, the researchers identified 725 cultural building projects started between 1994 and 2008, with a total cost of nearly $16 billion. One-half of the cultural building projects were multi-use performing arts centres, 39% were museums, and 11% were theatre-only projects.

The Value of Presenting: A Study of Arts Presentation in Canada

In addition to providing a profile of performing arts presenters and summarizing research into arts attendance in Canada, this report examines potential benefits of the arts, including impacts on the quality of life, well-being, social engagement, health, education, and communities.

Based on a survey of 1,001 Canadians 18 or older in June and July of 2012, this report examines Canadians’ attendance and personal involvement in the arts, culture, and heritage, as well as their perceptions regarding cultural activities and government support of culture.

Value of Presenting Study
The bulk of this presentation provides information about key demographic trends in Canada: a growing and aging population, differences in average age by location, increased immigration from Asian countries, and an increasing Aboriginal population. The report compares census data with attendance data to see whether different age groups are over or under-represented among performing arts audiences. The presentation indicates that classical music and theatre audiences skew older than the overall population, while popular music skews younger. The presentation also provides information about perceived benefits of the performing arts.
An Analysis of Attendance at Art Galleries, Theatres, Classical Music Performances, Popular Music Performances, and Cultural Festivals
Based on Statistics Canada’s 2010 General Social Survey, an in-depth telephone survey of about 7,500 Canadians 15 or older, this report concludes that “there is an arts-interested public that transcends demographics”. For example, the report indicates that “someone with less than a secondary school diploma was not very likely to visit an art gallery in 2010: only 20% did so. However, someone with the same level of education who attended a classical concert in 2010 was much more likely to visit an art gallery: 44% did so in 2010”.

This study attempts to address three key research questions: 1) "How is digital media currently used in theatres both in Ontario and beyond and what is the potential for expanding its use?"; 2) "How can the content developed for the stage be adapted and repurposed for use on digital media platforms?"; and 3) "How can theatres use digital media to reach a wider and more demographically diverse audience?"

Executive Summary

Based on a literature review and consultation with 250 arts practitioners and cultural workers, this report examines the impact of digital technologies on human resources in the cultural sector. The report argues that, "as the Canadian economy continues to move toward a knowledge-based economy, the creativity exhibited by the cultural sector will only increase in importance".

This report and two presentations were prepared by Kelly Hill using data submitted by 50 members of Orchestras Canada. Total revenues of the 50 orchestras equalled $158 million in 2010-11, with earned revenues accounting for the largest share (37%), followed by government revenues (34%) and private sector fundraising (29%). The breakdown of revenues by source remained fairly stable between 2004-05 and 2010-11.

(Les danseurs et chorégraphes québécois : Portrait des conditions de pratique de la profession de la danse au Québec, 2010)

This report examines the situation of the estimated 650 dancers and choreographers in Quebec. The survey found that the average personal income of Quebec dancers is $27,400. However, their net earnings (i.e., after expenses) from dance artistic activities are only $9,300.