Arts Research Monitor articles, category = Film, video and new media

Results from a 2011 Province-wide Study of the Arts Engagement Patterns of Ontario Adults

This report is based on a survey of 1,594 Ontario adults covering their personal practice, attendance and media-based consumption of 45 different arts activities. The report challenges "the arts community and its funders to consider the totality of engagement when looking to increase participation" and concludes that "increasing arts engagement in Ontario will require making new connections between different parts of the ecosystem and tapping into deep veins of cultural value".

Based on a compilation and analysis of existing statistics, this report provides detailed information about the cultural sector labour market, including seven cultural domains: "live performing arts; film, radio, TV, and broadcasting; music; heritage; books and periodicals; visual arts and crafts; and interactive digital media". The report outlines information about cultural occupations and employers, the cultural sector's economic situation, the financial performance of the seven cultural domains, as well as data challenges and opportunities. While most of the information is national in scope, the report does provide some provincial tables.

Based on a literature review, 39 key informant interviews, 15 focus group sessions and an online survey (completed by 2,698 cultural workers and employers), this report identifies key trends and issues regarding human resources in Canada's cultural sector and provides recommendations for addressing human resource challenges.

Compendium of Research Papers
The International Forum on the Creative Economy, a two-day forum in Gatineau, Quebec in March 2008, provides "evidence on the current and future economic forces and trends impacting the innovation, creative, and knowledge-based economies".
How does a nation acquire and display its art collection? Collections policies were discussed at length at the Summit.

Based on Statistics Canada's General Social Survey, this report provides provincial information about cultural and heritage activities in 1992 and 2005. In most provinces, as in Canada as a whole, most cultural and heritage activities attracted about the same percentage of the population in 2005 as in 1992. Given the strong population growth in most provinces between 1992 and 2005, almost all cultural and heritage activities saw an increase in the absolute number of provincial residents attending, visiting, reading, watching or listening.

Based on Statistics Canada's General Social Survey, this recent report from Hill Strategies Research provides statistical information about the cultural and heritage activities of Canadians in 2005 as well as changes in these activities between 1992 and 2005.

These four Statistics Canada products examine the culture sector's contribution to Gross Domestic Product and employment in various Canadian jurisdictions.

In an effort to facilitate access to cultural data, Statistics Canada has made a wide range of survey data available online for free. Site users can access culture surveys, data and analysis from Statistics Canada's Culture Statistics Program. Topics include government spending on culture, international cultural trade, as well as sectoral information on, for example, the performing arts, heritage institutions, film and video, movie theatres, and book and periodical publishing.
This report, prepared by Hill Strategies, uses 71 interviews with media artists, arts organizations and funders to examine the realities, functioning and importance of Canada's media arts sector. The sector was found to be "rapidly changing, difficult to define, very active and struggling to find money for its activities". Interviewees indicated that the production and exhibition of works by Aboriginal and culturally diverse artists are key to the development of the media arts.